08 Sept - IGGI Conference Day 1

Day 1 of the IGGI 2021 Conference was open to registered public - click location tabs for recordings (where available)

09:30 Coffee & Posters & Buzzes

IGGI Buzz Talks showcase each student's ongoing research in one concise minute. As they are pre-recorded this year, you can browse Buzz videos as well as Posters during our Coffee/Lunch Breaks.

10:00 Welcome 

Paul Cairns (IGGI Director), Peter Cowling (IGGI Director)

10:20 Panels

Student-moderated discussion rounds with panellists from games industry and academia. Parallel track.

Industry Panel 1

Starting Your Own Company: Considerations and Pitfalls

Panel: Amandine Flachs (WildMeta), Guy Davidson (Creative Assembly),  Adam Boyne (Betajester)

Moderated by Kyle Worrall

Industry Panel 2

Games User Research: Practices in Industry vs Academia

Panel: Leah Muwanga-Magoye (Fusebox Games), Dr. Kieran Hicks (University of Lincoln), Sebastian Deterding (University of York), Graham McAllister (TeamSync), Alex Whittaker (Fusebox Games)

Moderated by Nick Ballou

Industry Panel 3

From PhD to Industry: Identifying Transferable Skills from a PhD

Panel: Max Sloan (King), Rui Craveirinha (Player Research), Julia Hiltscher (ESL), Melissa Chaplin (Robot Teddy)


Moderated by Evelyn Tan

Industry Panel 4

Narrative Games Design: Designing for Emotional Experience

Panel: Marina Diez (Three of Cups Games, Un Je Ne Sais Quoi), Maddalena Grattarola (Space Backyard, Lecturer), Federico Fasce (Three of Cups Games, Lecturer), Alexander Swords (Swords Narrative)

Moderated by Timea Farkas & Charline Foch

11:50 Talks

Selected IGGI PhD researchers deliver a 15min pitch on a topic of their interest. Single track. 

Talk 1
11:50

Psychology in Games: A Look at the Interdisciplinary Relationship

by Maximilian Croissant

Abstract: Every aspect of human-computer interaction is deeply rooted in psychology. Psychological research has been used for years to explain the effects of games, moving from a heavy emphasis on violence and addiction to more and more positive aspects, such as well-being and education. While there are many benefits in applying psychological theories into the game design process, there is also less utilized potential in strengthening the interdisciplinary benefits through shared methodological approaches.

Talk 2
12:10

PhD&D - Insights in the Creation & Discussions around TTRPGs

by Matthew Whitby

Abstract: Alongside Matthew Whitby’s PhD in Designing for Perspective Challenging Experiences, he has been involved in creating 50+ TTRPG supplements, 75+ podcast discussions, & a whole bunch of community engagement. In this talk, he will break down some of the core lessons he’s stumbled across while designing alongside, overlap with his research, and the design knowledge gained from conducting interviews with novices to industry professionals. Those with a designerly or hobbyist interest in TTRPGs are bound to learn a thing or two!

12:30 Lunch & Posters & Buzzes

IGGI Buzz Talks showcase each student's ongoing research in one concise minute. As they are pre-recorded this year, you can browse Buzz videos as well as Posters during our Coffee/Lunch Breaks.

15:00 Coffee & Posters & Buzzes

IGGI Buzz Talks showcase each student's ongoing research in one concise minute. As they are pre-recorded this year, you can browse Buzz videos as well as Posters during our Coffee/Lunch Breaks.

14:00 Talks

Selected IGGI PhD researchers deliver a 15min pitch on a topic of their interest. Single track. 

Talk 3
14:00

Building on Sand? Opaque Reporting Practices of Player Motivation Questionnaires

by Nathan Hughes

Abstract: When evaluating player motivations, there are numerous questionnaires to choose from (over 20 in fact). This raises an interesting question: which one do you choose, and why? Consequently, how should this usage be reported to maximise transparency? This talk discusses the results of a content analysis of 270 papers that have used such questionnaires, with the goal of understanding current reporting practices. First, the most common reasons for using questionnaires are presented. Second, eight ways to improve transparency in reporting questionnaires are explored. Adopting these practices will allow for more open science, where results can be built upon with confidence.

Talk 4
14:20

Player Experience(s) of Failure in Video Games

by Charline Foch

Abstract: How do video games players experience failure? How do they conceptualise it? Why does it matter? While research has been exploring the advantages of failure mechanics in video games as a tool for learning, as well as its potential for designing frustration, this talk explores what video games players themselves report as memorable experiences of, and desirable takeaways from, failure. Spanning a wide range of games and genres, players show a rich and varied understanding of failure, of which this talk will attempt to offer an initial breakdown.

Talk 5
14:40

Player Mood in Gaming, Competitive and Casual

by Laura Helsby and Guilherme Matos de Faria

Abstract: A joint talk offering two perspectives on how gaming and mood interact, and how this might influence people’s motivations for playing games. Laura will discuss some of the literature surrounding mood and gaming and present some preliminary findings from an interview study she conducted looking at persistent low mood and gaming habits. Guilherme will provide insight into the motivations of players both from a casual and competitive perspective. This insight is supported by research and personal experiences in competitive groups.

15:30 Talks

Selected IGGI PhD researchers deliver a 15min pitch on a topic of their interest. Single track. 

Talk 6
15:30

Health Economics and Game Design: What They Can Learn from Each Other

by Michael Saiger

Abstract: Game design and development asks how to build and design a game. Game production is concerned with how to make a profit and manage a business. However, when it concerns games designed for a purpose, such as education or healthcare, other questions come to mind; how costly is a game to implement? Do the benefits of a game outweigh the training? Which audiences benefit from a game for purpose? These questions are not regularly considered in traditional game development but are key in health economics. This talk is a brief insight into how health economic evaluations could be used in development of games for purpose.

Talk 7
15:50

Challenges and Barriers to Accessible Game Development

by Jozef Kulik

Abstract: Through interviews with a variety of game developers, across distinct studios and roles, I present a grounded theory approach to understanding the experiences of game development, specifically within the context of making accessible games. This theory details various challenges and barriers to making accessible games, and identifies them within their personal, organisational and external context. This knowledge could provide a helpful direction for further research that might seek to aid game developers in making accessible games, and from an industry perspective could provide helpful identifying areas of improvement that could help a studio in their efforts to improve the accessibility of their games.

Talk 8
16:10

Automated Game Design for Exploratory Games

by Bobby Khaleque

Abstract: Automated Game Design (AGD) is a new and emerging topic within games research, which has previously focused on a mostly “rules and mechanics” focused view. This talk details an investigation of whole game generation for exploratory games, games less focused on rules and mechanics and more on aesthetic design and exploration. Exploratory games are defined as games of which the main mechanic is to reveal a/multiple narrative(s) or theme(s) through visual or aural observation, where a key interaction is traversal of the environment.

16:30 Leavers Ceremony

A session to celebrate IGGI alumni 

17:00 End of Day's Official Programme

20:00 Social (online & local groups)

Online social event on gather.town. Local groups in York and London: book before 06 Sep 2021